DENIAL AND ADDICTION

Reach out now, we can help
Home / Posts tagged "#PTA rehab"

DENIAL AND ADDICTION

10 November, 2021Articles, News

Most of us have been unwilling to admit we were real alcoholics. No person likes to think he is bodily and mentally different from his fellows. Therefore, it is not surprising that our drinking careers have been characterized by countless vain attempts to prove we could drink like other people. The idea that somehow, someday he will control and enjoy his drinking is the great obsession of every abnormal drinker. The persistence of this illusion is astonishing. Many pursue it into the gates of insanity or death.”

-Insert from Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous pg 30, MORE ABOUT ALCOHOLISM.

Denial and addiction go hand in hand, and once identified should not be dismissed, as overcoming denial is the initial step into seeking help or treatment and opening the door to change and recovery.

WHAT IS DENIAL:

Denial is the common defense mechanism which is used to avoid painful emotions associated with the reality of addiction. These emotions cause discomfort. Unfortunately denial is only a short term solution as nothing has been done to address the problem nor any attempt made to change the situation or resolve the problem. The shortened version of denial is a case of saying “it isn’t so” or “it is not true”, despite the reality that is obvious to other’s involved and witnessing the results of an addiction. Outsiders are often quicker to identify the denial, however, may too, be in denial around the severity of the addiction and struggle to recognise if the situation is denial or simply normal destructive behavior. Denial happens when a person can’t or won’t face what they know deep down to be true.

Commonly when or once a decision has been made to seek treatment for addiction, a huge web of denial and mistruth’s around the individual and their thinking patterns have been altered and formed to accommodate depenance or addiction. Treatment for addiction includes the undoing of these patterns and thinking and is a vital part of the change required for the road to recovery and change.

CHARACTERISTICS OF DENIAL PATTERNS:

Being able to honestly identify and or admitting to the following will be able to establish if any denial is present.

  • Difficulty in identifying true feelings.
  • Tend to minimise the intensity of feelings.
  • Identifying as a selfless being.
  • Tend to project negative traits onto others.
  • Resist or put down any help from others.
  • Lack empathy for others.
  • False belief that one is self-sufficient.
  • Mask pain with other negative emotional states, like sarcasm, anger, and frustration.
  • Tendency to covert uncomfortable feelings to aggression.
  • Lacking in insight or poor interpersonal relationships

INDENTIFING DENIAL:

It could be helpful to consider these questions which could assist in seeking treatment and overcoming the fact that there is denial around addiction:

  • Refusing criticism or honest loving comments from others who express concern around signs of addiction or addictive behavior
  • Unwillingness to see that the behaviour around substances is contributing to a deterioration in all areas of life
  • Worried about the stigma associated with addiction or afraid to seek or accept help
  • Lost a job or been reprimanded as a result of behaviour or substance abuse
  • Lost time at workplace for unexplainable illness or increased absence from workplace
  • Family negatively affected by addictive behaviour
  • Repeatedly tried and failed to stay clean or sober
  • Given up on goals or personal dreams as a result of been stuck in addiction
  • No longer care about broken promises made to loved ones

Overcoming denial is possible and it may be that the denial is so evident that the individual decides to face the truth and seek help and treatment. On the other hand, the denial may be so embedded that it appears improbable to acknowledge that there is a problem and a need for treatment and change. Often, after years of denial that there is a problem with addiction, there is an undeniable accumulation of evidence pointing to a need for treatment for addiction and loved ones may need to intervene to allow the addict access to treatment and recovery.

COMMON DENIAL PATTERNS:

Common denial patterns have been indentified that keep an individual trapped in resisting any change or seeking treatment for denial and addiction. The presence of these denial patterns will not resolve the problem and the sooner these are addressed the sooner the problem is addressed.

  • AVOIDANCE:

This is when there is a blatant refusal to talk about the problem. Individuals completely avoid any attempts to talk about the problem and are firm in the belief about not having a problem.

  • ABSOLUTE DENIAL:

An adamant belief that there is no problem. The absolute idea that everything is alright. Complete unwillingness to consider that there is a problem.

  • MINIMISING:

A tendency to minimise the effect of the addiction, and assume that the situation is not as bad as others makes it out to be.

  • RATIONALISING:

The ability to justify the behaviour to oneself or others. A tendency to find reasons for the behaviour.

  • BLAMING:

This involves putting the blame on others and the inability to take any responsibility for the situation.

  • COMAPARING:

This is a constant comparing of the situation or problem and is usually done with a person who is worse, in an attempt to feel better about their current situation.

  • COMPLIANCE:

This is when there is pretence to do what is required, which simply masks the problem and does not do anything to address the situation.

  • MANIPULATION:

People affected by the addiction and denial are manipulated, usually in the form of pushing them away, anger or temper tantrums. Another form of this is to please the other party in an attempt to not look at the problem.

  • FLIGHT INTO HEALTH:

The addict attempts to mask the problem by pretending to be in good health physically and emotionally to show that they have been cured and no further problem exists.

  • RECOVERY BY FEAR:

Fear of change and consequences cause an addict to avoid looking at the problem or treating the problem.

  • HOPELESSNESS:

This is seen when a person believes that there is no solution to the problem, and as result they do not address or seek treatment for the problem.

  • DEMOCRATIC:

When a person is finds comfort in the “sick role” and tends to get defensive about getting support or treatment.

CONCLUSION:

Breaking through denial and admitting that there is a problem is one of the most challenging aspects of seeking treatment for addiction, and looking at one’s own truth’s and realities is painful. Once these beliefs and ideas are broken, the ability to engage in effective treatment is possible, and new tools are given to cope with the pain and reality of addiction. The addict can ultimately find recovery and a new way to live.

If you or a loved one needs assistance with addiction and denial – know that help is readily available. The road to recovery is not always an easy one but getting yourself or your loved one the best possible care from the team at Crossroads Recovery Centre, provides you with a map to sober, healthy living. No matter how bad things seem, there is hope and it’s only a phone call away. If you or anyone close to you needs help with an addiction to sex, gambling, substances, alcohol or food, please contact us for a free assessment.

RESOURCES:

www.sunshinebehaviouralhealth.com

www.recoverythought.journal.com

www.123helpme.com

www.azureacres.com

Big Book Alcoholics Anonymous

No Obligation Addiction Assessment

Book a No Obligation Confidential Assessment at your nearest Treatment Centre Today.

Johannesburg Admissions: +27 74 895 1043
Pretoria Admissions: +27 82 653 3311
Close

Stories of Recovery

  • The encouragement, love and support from the team at Crossroads allowed me to eventually see that I was worth something - that my life could be turned around and that I could accomplish the things that had long been a forgotten dream.
    Oliver VG
    Read more
  • On the last day of my stint at Crossroads I could only express gratitude towards all who works there. A wise councillor once commented on my question when one is ready for rehab by explaining that when one is ready for rehab, rehab is ready for you.
    Johan B
    Read more
  • I was lost and my soul was broken until I ended up at Crossroads and was introduced to the Twelve Steps. With the help of their excellent staff and amazing support I have recently been clean for 18 months, I could not have done it without them!
    Carla S
    Read more
  • "Just for today I am more than three years in recovery. I have Cross Roads to thank for this wonderful gift. Cross Roads helped me to set a firm foundation in my recovery on which I can continue to build."
    Angelique J
    Read more
Left Arrow Right Arrow

Approved Medical Aids

Bestmed LogoBonitas LogoCAMAF LogoDiscovery Health LogoFedhealth LogoGovernment Employees Medical SchemeLiberty CorporateMedihelp Medical Scheme

Crazy Crystal Meth

Reach out now, we can help
Home / Posts tagged "#PTA rehab"

Crazy Crystal Meth

20 October, 2021Articles, News

Over the recent past, most rehabs in South Africa, have seen an exponential growth in the number of clients who present with paranoid thoughts and behaviour as a result of the abuse of crystal meth as it is commonly called.

Where did it originate?

Methamphetamine is a man-made stimulant that’s been around for a long time. During World War II, soldiers were given meth to keep them awake. People have also taken the drug to lose weight and ease depression. It has also been used for the treatment of obesity and in the treatment of ADHD.

Crystal meth is made with the ingredient pseudoephedrine, which is found in many flu and cold remedies. It was mainly produced in labs in Mexico however many small labs appear to have sprung up in South Africa. The ingredients are usually variable-depending on that is cheap and accessible at the time, therefore the user never quite knows what they are getting. There is some indication from users that they believe it to be laced with what they refer to as “spiritual stuff” (muthi).

What Are the Effects?

  • Meth can make a user’s body temperature rise so high they could pass out or even die.
  • A user may feel anxious and confused, be unable to sleep, have mood swings, and become violent.
  • A user may age quickly. His/her skin may dull, and he/she can develop hard-to-heal sores and pimples. They may have a dry mouth and stained, broken, or rotting teeth (meth mouth).
  • They may also become paranoid and hear and see things that aren’t there.

It is this last point that seems to be the most prevalent and most concerning for rehab and addiction practitioners. An almost entrenched paranoia that seems to last for many months even though the toxic effects of the methamphetamine should, theoretically, no longer be present in the body.

The research

The link between crystal meth use and symptoms of paranoia is well known and well documented in the relevant literature. The real concern for practitioners in the rehab field is being able to differentiate what is crystal meth induced paranoia and what is possibly a psychiatric disorder such as schizophrenia or even bipolar mood disorder.

Several research groups, especially in Japan, have successfully studied methamphetamine-induced paranoia. These studies are well respected as the Japanese methamphetamine subculture is characterised by single use drug users- poly-drug (multiple substances) use has been uncommon. The results showed that a small percentage of meth users suffer from entrenched paranoia after at least 6 months of sobriety but there were a number of cases where even though people had been clean for many years there were still signs of paranoid delusions unrelated to a more severe psychiatric disorder.

Meth-induced psychosis sometimes presents in a similar way to paranoid schizophrenia and research has shown that at least 60 percent of people who use meth experience psychotic symptoms and syndromes.

What are the major signs of meth induced psychosis?

  • delusions
  • hallucinations,
  • paranoia, and sometimes
  • violent behaviour.

It is extremely difficult to differentiate hallucinations from what is real.

Prior to developing psychosis, a person who uses meth, may encounter a pre-psychotic state that is marked by delusional moods and ideas of reference or believing that everyday events have great personal significance. Delusions and hallucinations accompany full-blown psychosis.

People who are dependent on meth, who use high doses, who experienced childhood trauma, and/or who start taking the drug at a young age have an increased risk of having psychotic symptoms. The sleep deprivation that often accompanies meth use may aggravate these symptoms as well.

Other warning signs of crystal meth psychosis

  • Meth delusions: A person has strange, unrealistic, and/or false beliefs.
  • Meth hallucinations: Auditory, visual, or tactile hallucinations make a person hear, see, or feel things that don’t exist.
  • Meth paranoia: A person becomes extremely suspicious of those around them and may even believe that people are out to get them.

How long can these signs remain?

It is usually dependent on the physical characteristics of the individual as well as their level of mental health, and severity of drug use.

Meth psychosis may last several hours, and on average, a person typically recovers from it in one week. However, psychosis sometimes lasts for months and even years after a person stops using. Spontaneous flashback psychotic episodes may also be triggered by stress or by using the drug again.

The Treatment processes

Individuals experiencing meth psychosis may need some form of stabilisation in specialised health care facilities before coming to rehab.

At Crossroads we apply a combination of the 12-step programme as well as the traditional Crossroads treatment methodology, which involves group therapy, family support and individual counselling .

Individuals with a dual diagnosis and co-occurring mental health disorders, such as schizophrenia, may be better served in an inpatient or residential treatment program until they are stable.

If you or a loved one needs assistance with an addiction to crystal meth– know that help is readily available. We have an experienced team which includes medical staff to assist with safe medical detox where necessary. The road to recovery is not always an easy one but getting yourself or your loved one the best possible care from the team at Crossroads Recovery Centre, provides you with a map to sober, healthy living. No matter how bad things seem, there is hope and it’s only a phone call away. If you or anyone close to you needs help with an addiction to sexgamblingsubstancesalcohol or food, please contact us for a free assessment.

www.crossroadsrecovery.co.za

074 89 51043 JHB

012 450 5033 PTA

No Obligation Addiction Assessment

Book a No Obligation Confidential Assessment at your nearest Treatment Centre Today.

Johannesburg Admissions: +27 74 895 1043
Pretoria Admissions: +27 82 653 3311
Close

Stories of Recovery

  • The encouragement, love and support from the team at Crossroads allowed me to eventually see that I was worth something - that my life could be turned around and that I could accomplish the things that had long been a forgotten dream.
    Oliver VG
    Read more
  • On the last day of my stint at Crossroads I could only express gratitude towards all who works there. A wise councillor once commented on my question when one is ready for rehab by explaining that when one is ready for rehab, rehab is ready for you.
    Johan B
    Read more
  • I was lost and my soul was broken until I ended up at Crossroads and was introduced to the Twelve Steps. With the help of their excellent staff and amazing support I have recently been clean for 18 months, I could not have done it without them!
    Carla S
    Read more
  • "Just for today I am more than three years in recovery. I have Cross Roads to thank for this wonderful gift. Cross Roads helped me to set a firm foundation in my recovery on which I can continue to build."
    Angelique J
    Read more
Left Arrow Right Arrow

Approved Medical Aids

Bestmed LogoBonitas LogoCAMAF LogoDiscovery Health LogoFedhealth LogoGovernment Employees Medical SchemeLiberty CorporateMedihelp Medical Scheme

Gambling Addiction Rehab – when it is time to go.

Reach out now, we can help
Home / Posts tagged "#PTA rehab"

Gambling Addiction Rehab – when it is time to go.

15 October, 2021Articles, News

Gambling has the same physiological or hormonal effect on the brain as the use of drugs and alcohol. It begins with the surge of excitement in anticipation of the act, the extreme adrenaline rush that occurs when gambling and the unparalleled high of winning, followed by the compulsion to do it all over again. Gambling addiction, like drug and alcohol addiction, is a seriously devastating problem that has far-reaching consequences. These are a few of the warning signs of how to recognise when gamblers become gambling addicts and need gambling addiction rehab.

Compulsively Chasing Losses

Winning a game produces an exhilarating high for any gambler. The difference between periodic gamblers and gambling addicts, is that for the latter, that high is addictive. Gambling addicts will stop at nothing to achieve that first high again and again. On the other hand, losing produces a mental low that can feel like extreme disappointment and in some cases, depression. When this happens, most gamblers know when to stop. Gambling addicts however, find themselves unable to resist “chasing their losses”. In other words, they place even higher bets or cash in even more money in an attempt to win back the money they have lost. It is not uncommon for gambling addicts to max out multiple credit cards, pawn their valuables or even steal money to chase their losses, believing that “one more bet” or “one more hand” will see their luck restored. This behaviour leads to an inevitable and vicious downward spiral.

Mental and Emotional Instability

We see it in the movies all the time – heroin addicts withdrawing, writhing in pain, lashing out at those around them or being unable to get out of bed. What we don’t often see in the movies, is the way in which gambling addicts withdraw. In truth, withdrawal from gambling and withdrawal from drugs can look surprisingly similar. Gambling addicts who don’t get their fix can become extremely aggressive and unable to be in the presence of others. They can become visibly agitated and hostile towards those around them. Only a trip to the casino can abate what can accurately be described as a craving. For an addict in the grips of a gambling addiction, anything that stands in the way of them placing the next bet, becomes a threat that needs to be removed. Unfortunately, this can lead to strained relationships, emotional unavailability and in some cases, abuse.

Secretiveness

Gambling addiction may be difficult to spot at first, because gambling addicts may feel compelled to keep their behaviour a secret. They may feel deeply ashamed or embarrassed – deep down they may know that they have a problem but may be resistant to asking for help. Warning signs include dishonesty around their whereabouts or the inability to explain how they are spending their money. A common experience is that gambling addicts may be too afraid to explain why their money has run out, so they keep their gambling behaviour a secret, secretly dreaming of the day they can appease their loved ones with the surprise of a big win. Unfortunately, for gambling addicts that win is never big enough and a win always precedes another bet in the hopes of winning even bigger. The compulsion is all-consuming.

If you or a loved one is a gambler and needs to go to gambling addiction rehab, know that help is readily available. Contact us for a free consultation and we’ll support you in your recovery journey.

www.crossroadsrecovery.co.za

074 89 51043 JHB

012 450 5033 PTA

RESOURCES

Helpguide.org

No Obligation Addiction Assessment

Book a No Obligation Confidential Assessment at your nearest Treatment Centre Today.

Johannesburg Admissions: +27 74 895 1043
Pretoria Admissions: +27 82 653 3311
Close

Stories of Recovery

  • The encouragement, love and support from the team at Crossroads allowed me to eventually see that I was worth something - that my life could be turned around and that I could accomplish the things that had long been a forgotten dream.
    Oliver VG
    Read more
  • On the last day of my stint at Crossroads I could only express gratitude towards all who works there. A wise councillor once commented on my question when one is ready for rehab by explaining that when one is ready for rehab, rehab is ready for you.
    Johan B
    Read more
  • I was lost and my soul was broken until I ended up at Crossroads and was introduced to the Twelve Steps. With the help of their excellent staff and amazing support I have recently been clean for 18 months, I could not have done it without them!
    Carla S
    Read more
  • "Just for today I am more than three years in recovery. I have Cross Roads to thank for this wonderful gift. Cross Roads helped me to set a firm foundation in my recovery on which I can continue to build."
    Angelique J
    Read more
Left Arrow Right Arrow

Approved Medical Aids

Bestmed LogoBonitas LogoCAMAF LogoDiscovery Health LogoFedhealth LogoGovernment Employees Medical SchemeLiberty CorporateMedihelp Medical Scheme

What is Porn Addiction?

Reach out now, we can help
Home / Posts tagged "#PTA rehab"

What is Porn Addiction?

13 October, 2021Articles, News

Porn addiction is a behavioural disorder classified by people who experience difficulties with all-consuming sexual thoughts and behaviours. Their compulsions to watch pornography consequently can create emotional fall-outs such as stress, mood swings, depression or anxiety. People struggling with porn addiction problems tend to find they live a “double life” which may result in them pulling away from significant life events and relationships with others.

These behaviours may often be linked to intimacy-related issues or the inability to communicate or connect on interpersonal levels with a romantic partner. Porn addiction and the underlying fantasies they offer allow people an “escape” from having to confront their reality. This may include the unpredictability of real-life interpersonal relationships, their fears of rejection, judgement or past trauma which may all often trigger emotionally painful events. In some cases, the side-effect is that porn is simply being used to avoid certain situations.

Historically the medical field has described addiction as a chronic relapsing disorder, or continued use of illicit substances (including alcohol) despite the negative consequences that result from prolonged use. It is when someone abuses substances such as alcohol or drugs to the point where their body becomes overly dependent on the substance to function. As the physiology of an addict’s or alcoholic’s body is different from the average person, their use of substances/alcohol creates a physical craving for more each time either is consumed. But how does this explain porn addiction problems and a non-substance related addictions such as a porn addiction?

While many people understand the addiction to alcohol or drugs, not everyone realises how viewing pornographic material obsessively, being exposed to sexual imagery or videos can be extremely addictive; especially since it’s not a physical intake of a chemical or substance that they put into their body. However, pornography and porn addiction problems can still activate regions in the brain that are associated with motivation and reward – such as the dopamine system.

Porn addiction is when the brain becomes dependent on pornography to experience dopamine surges; therefore, it may cause a lack of control over their sexual behaviour. The obsessive and compulsive behaviour of viewing pornography is the brain’s demanding need for stimulus, and each time the act of viewing occurs so does a release of dopamine. However, over time, the body stops providing as much dopamine as it did when first engaged with porn – which means people begin to watch it more often or view more extreme pornographic scenes to receive the same pleasure. The constant craving for these dopamine surges can reduce the brain’s response to ordinary stimuli. Which in turn increases the desperate need to view more pornographic content more frequently and dependency is established.

What are the side-effects of porn addiction?

The side effects of porn addiction problems may vary from person to person, and some scenarios will require formal treatment.

As porn addiction is a deeply private, fantasy-driven realm for individuals, and is a classic “escape” from an otherwise mundane or routine driven existence, a person’s real life tends to become less of a priority and riskier behaviours begin to emerge. Obsessive thoughts and compulsive sexual behaviours begin to displace relationships and negatively harm a person’s real life in terms of work and other relationships.

When a person starts to avoid their lives in favour of their routine escapes- their fantasy begins to overtake the importance of their reality and consequentially impacts their well-being. This cycle can often result in feeling disconnected from others. It also tends to manifest in other addictions or co-occurring destructive behaviours such as eating disorders, depression, chronic stress, depression and anxiety.  As porn addiction problems are considered an intimacy disorder, it becomes hard for a person to mask the underlying need to escape to porn or “wanting to leave” everyday scenarios to satisfy a porn craving. Often people with porn addiction problems may at times get angry or hostile, or even just irritable when they are asked to stop engaging with pornography or forced to endure events/situations where porn viewing may not be available.

Another marked side-effect of porn addiction includes the secrecy involved in their attempts to “hide” their use of porn from loved ones. This, in turn, creates the sense of living a “double” or “secret” life that is directly attributed to obsessive porn use and has a negative impact on critical things like attending work, events or prioritising personal well-being and relationships. With any case of classifiable addiction, there is a distinct sense of personal powerlessness or an inability to stop the behaviour for any length of time.

If you or a loved one are battling a porn addiction and need assistance – know that help is readily available. The road to recovery is not always an easy one, but getting yourself or your loved one the best care from the team at Crossroads Recovery Centre, provides you with a map to sober, healthy living. No matter how bad things seem, there is hope and it’s just a phone call away. If you or anyone close to you needs help with an addiction to sexgambling, substances, alcohol or food, please contact us for a free assessment.

www.crossroadsrecovery.co.za

074 89 51043 JHB

012 450 5033 PTA

No Obligation Addiction Assessment

Book a No Obligation Confidential Assessment at your nearest Treatment Centre Today.

Johannesburg Admissions: +27 74 895 1043
Pretoria Admissions: +27 82 653 3311
Close

Stories of Recovery

  • The encouragement, love and support from the team at Crossroads allowed me to eventually see that I was worth something - that my life could be turned around and that I could accomplish the things that had long been a forgotten dream.
    Oliver VG
    Read more
  • On the last day of my stint at Crossroads I could only express gratitude towards all who works there. A wise councillor once commented on my question when one is ready for rehab by explaining that when one is ready for rehab, rehab is ready for you.
    Johan B
    Read more
  • I was lost and my soul was broken until I ended up at Crossroads and was introduced to the Twelve Steps. With the help of their excellent staff and amazing support I have recently been clean for 18 months, I could not have done it without them!
    Carla S
    Read more
  • "Just for today I am more than three years in recovery. I have Cross Roads to thank for this wonderful gift. Cross Roads helped me to set a firm foundation in my recovery on which I can continue to build."
    Angelique J
    Read more
Left Arrow Right Arrow

Approved Medical Aids

Bestmed LogoBonitas LogoCAMAF LogoDiscovery Health LogoFedhealth LogoGovernment Employees Medical SchemeLiberty CorporateMedihelp Medical Scheme