What Does a Drug Recovery Treatment Programme Entail?

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What Does a Drug Recovery Treatment Programme Entail?

09 July, 2020Articles, News

Recovery from addiction in any form is a process that cannot be done in isolation. That’s a lesson that many recovering addicts have come to learn and appreciate. For many, recovery begins with going through a rehabilitation process that may involve a recovery treatment programme.

It is often the case that clients arrive at treatment centres with a preconceived notion about what rehabilitation is. Many of them feel fearful and apprehensive about the process. While it is true that indeed it can be a challenging process, many addicts also find it to be an enlightening and uplifting process – one that could indeed change the course of their lives.

At Crossroads Recovery Centres, we apply a range of therapeutic methodologies in the treatment of addiction, but at the crux of our recovery treatment programme, is the Narcotics Anonymous programme which includes 12 fundamental steps. These steps form the basis of a new way of life for many recovery addicts. They include coming to understand one’s powerlessness against addiction in any form, taking inventory of aspects such as guilt, shame and resentment and making amends to people whom the addict may have hurt.

The 12 steps offer a simple, spiritual, not religious way to recover from drug addiction, one day at a time. As part of the recovery treatment programme at Crossroads Recovery Centres, we ensure that clients are introduced to the 12 steps during their stay.

We recommend a minimum stay of 28 days, during which clients will be expected to complete the first 3 steps in writing, as well as a life story. Clients who stay for an additional 28 days will be expected to complete steps 4 to 8. Finally, clients who stay for the full duration of 84 days, will complete all 12 steps as part of the programme.

Upon leaving the treatment centre, clients will have the option of attending 12-step meetings that are relevant to their particular addiction. In this regard, there are a number 12-step fellowships around the world for various kinds of addictions like drugs, sex, gambling and food addiction.

If you or a loved one is in search of help for addiction in any form, know that help is readily available. Contact us for a free consultation and we’ll support you in your journey.

No Obligation Addiction Assessment

Book a No Obligation Confidential Assessment at your nearest Treatment Centre Today.

Johannesburg Admissions: +27 74 895 1043
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Stories of Recovery

  • The encouragement, love and support from the team at Crossroads allowed me to eventually see that I was worth something - that my life could be turned around and that I could accomplish the things that had long been a forgotten dream.
    Oliver VG
    Read more
  • On the last day of my stint at Crossroads I could only express gratitude towards all who works there. A wise councillor once commented on my question when one is ready for rehab by explaining that when one is ready for rehab, rehab is ready for you.
    Johan B
    Read more
  • I was lost and my soul was broken until I ended up at Crossroads and was introduced to the Twelve Steps. With the help of their excellent staff and amazing support I have recently been clean for 18 months, I could not have done it without them!
    Carla S
    Read more
  • "Just for today I am more than three years in recovery. I have Cross Roads to thank for this wonderful gift. Cross Roads helped me to set a firm foundation in my recovery on which I can continue to build."
    Angelique J
    Read more
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What is codependency?

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What is codependency?

21 June, 2019Articles, News

Codependency is defined as: an excessive emotional or psychological reliance on a partner, typically one who requires support on account of an illness or addiction. It affects an individual’s capacity to have healthy, mutually satisfying relationships.

Who is affected by codependency?

When growing up in a family where one or both parents are unreliable or unavailable due to mental illness or addiction, a child learns to put the parents’ needs first. In dysfunctional families, feelings are suppressed and problems are avoided. The child’s needs are put below those of the parent. Growing up under these conditions means that these behaviours are likely to be repeated in other relationships.

The enabling wife of the alcoholic husband is a classic example of codependency. Today this has been expanded to a parent, spouse, friend, work colleague, sibling or any person who has a relationship with someone with mental illness or a person who suffers from substance use disorder (SDU), .

What do we see in the codependent?

Codependent individuals believe they share in the responsibility of their partners negative behaviour. They often have low self-esteem and find value and purpose in ensuring the well-being of the unhealthy partner. The codependent compulsively plays the martyr role in the relationship.

He or she holds on to the sense of being needed. There is often denial around the actions of the afflicted partner and around their role in the relationship. This is followed by the need to rescue. There is an unhealthy, over-reliance on the relationship and a deep need to hold on to it to avoid feelings of failure or abandonment.

The hallmarks of a codependent relationship include: poor communication, a lack of boundaries, a deep need for approval and validation, persistent anger, dishonesty and a need to control.

What can we do about codependency?

There is hope for the codependent and that hope comes from understanding. By understanding the unhealthy behaviour and its consequences, they are able to make the necessary changes. Addiction extends into relationships and it is important that family members educate themselves and get an understanding of the addiction cycle.

It is vital to investigate childhood issues, the destructive behaviours in relationships past and present as well as to identify emotions and learn to both feel them and express them.

The goals for the codependent in recovery are to have mutually satisfying relationships, avoid the negative behaviour patterns of the past and to learn to identify their own wants and needs. Put boundaries in place and stick to them. Once the process of recovery begins, one will understand that there is no need to hold on to unhealthy/destructive relationships and your happiness is not based on what others think. You are not responsible for the happiness of others.

Sources:

https://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/co-dependency
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/anxiety-zen/201609/6-signs-codependent-relationship

www.crossroadsrecovery.co.za

+27 012 345 1186 Pretoria

+27 010 597 7784 Johannesburg

No Obligation Addiction Assessment

Book a No Obligation Confidential Assessment at your nearest Treatment Centre Today.

Johannesburg Admissions: +27 74 895 1043
Pretoria Admissions: +27 82 653 3311
Close

Stories of Recovery

  • The encouragement, love and support from the team at Crossroads allowed me to eventually see that I was worth something - that my life could be turned around and that I could accomplish the things that had long been a forgotten dream.
    Oliver VG
    Read more
  • On the last day of my stint at Crossroads I could only express gratitude towards all who works there. A wise councillor once commented on my question when one is ready for rehab by explaining that when one is ready for rehab, rehab is ready for you.
    Johan B
    Read more
  • I was lost and my soul was broken until I ended up at Crossroads and was introduced to the Twelve Steps. With the help of their excellent staff and amazing support I have recently been clean for 18 months, I could not have done it without them!
    Carla S
    Read more
  • "Just for today I am more than three years in recovery. I have Cross Roads to thank for this wonderful gift. Cross Roads helped me to set a firm foundation in my recovery on which I can continue to build."
    Angelique J
    Read more
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Relationships in Recovery

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Home / Posts tagged "12 step"

Relationships in Recovery

07 June, 2019Articles, News

Relationships and addiction

Living with active addiction creates extraordinary relationship challenges and does considerable damage to significant relationships—with partners, parents, children, other family members, and close friends. When you enter recovery, it’s natural to want to repair this damage as soon as possible, and your impulse might be to try to do just that. However, attempting quick fixes is rarely helpful and almost never works well. Often, it can make things worse.

In terms of the relationships you want to improve, how long did it take to damage them in the ways that you had prior to going commencing recovery? Months? Years? It may not take as long to undo the harm your addiction caused, but it will take time. How many times before have you promised your loved ones that you would change? Create empathy by putting yourself in their position. How many times have you said, “I’m sorry. It won’t happen again”? Perhaps you believed it yourself and genuinely intended to change, but “it” did happen again (and perhaps again, and again).

Whether you’ve been in recovery previously or this is your first attempt at it, why should they believe you now? How many times have you told them that, this time things will be different? The more often this happened, the harder it will be for the important people in your life to trust that this time really will be different.

Adjustments in recovery

Most people experience deep regret, guilt, and shame related to the harm their use of alcohol and other drugs has caused to the people they care about. Frequently, wanting to “fix” important relationships immediately is based on a desire to alleviate the emotional pain of having hurt loved ones. But, pain—both emotional and physical—is an inevitable aspect of life. It is part of being human. The process of recovery requires learning how to accept and go through the pain that life brings you. Part of this process is accepting that repairing the damage your addiction has done to your relationships will only happen gradually over time—based on what you do rather than what you say. The saying, actions speak louder than words, is especially accurate related to recovery.

It will be helpful to resist the urge to focus on fixing your relationships, and keep the focus on making progress in your recovery. As you continue to work on your recovery, over time your relationships are likely to improve. The best way to resolve relationship issues is through slow, incremental change.

The role of relationships in recovery

Clearly, supportive relationships provide many benefits. The process of recovery from addiction is supported through relationships and social networks. Recovery support is provided through treatment, services, and community-based programs by behavioural health care providers, peer providers, family members, friends and social networks, the faith community, and people with experience in recovery.

Unfortunately, people with addiction are inclined to isolate, effectively cutting themselves off from the health-enhancing effects of social and emotional support. This support becomes even more important in early recovery, when people are struggling to get used to life without using alcohol and other drugs. At this time, developing relationships that provide mutual support and connection is essential. Twelve-step programs and other mutual-aid resources help to serve this vital purpose.

While some relationships are based on circumstances over which you have little or no control, you do have choices in establishing relationships that provide support and nurture you. Cultivating and maintaining supportive relationships takes time and energy. It requires effort, along with the strength and courage to step outside of one’s comfort zone.

Part of the growth and healing that frequently occurs in recovery involves learning how, when and with whom to take down the walls and false fronts that people have put up to protect themselves, and begin to allow others to see and get to know the “real” them. Twelve-step programs can offer support and guidance from others who have been through the same kinds of experiences—who have been there and done that—and have learned how to be successful in the face of the challenges of recovery from addiction. To paraphrase some twelve-step literature, through the process of recovery you can transition from a life characterized by taking and being taken to one based on giving and being given.

Reviewing your current relationships

It is important to take inventory of your current relationships so you can identify those that will help or hinder your progress toward health and healing in recovery. Moreover, consider whether relationships that are not supportive of your priorities deserve your time and energy. If something doesn’t seem or feel “right,” it’s important to pay attention to that gut feeling, be able to communicate about it. Identifying and shedding unhealthy or “toxic” relationships is also part of the recovery process.

What about new relationships?

In any close relationship, people share important aspects of their life experience and who they are. As a result, it’s essential to consider sharing the fact that you are in recovery with those people with whom you are or would like to become emotionally close—assuming that they aren’t already aware of it. But, how do you know when to let others know that you’re in recovery from addiction? Many people have a lot of uncertainty about disclosing their status as a person in recovery in new relationships. Such relationships include new friends, co-workers, and romantic partners.

Disclosing your recovery status

There are different opinions on when and how to disclose your recovery status. Some people believe it’s important to be completely up front and let others know that you are a person in recovery during your very first encounter. Others take the position that it is best to see how the relationship develops and use that information to determine when to disclose. Although rare, there are some work situations in which a person’s recovery status might possibly be held against him or her. There are certain industries where business is frequently conducted around activities where alcohol is served and drinking is customary.

Ultimately, disclosing your recovery status to others is a very personal decision and the timing of it depends on a variety of factors. That being said, your most important priority needs to be protecting your recovery. This means taking care not put yourself in situations where your recovery is likely to be at risk.

Although no one in recovery is immune to the possibility of relapse, those who are new(er) are especially vulnerable. Therefore, informing people to whom you are becoming close that you don’t drink alcohol or use other drugs—sooner rather than later—will help you avoid many risky situations. Getting involved in or maintaining a close relationship with anyone who regularly uses alcohol or other drugs, particularly in your presence, places you at considerable risk.

You may be concerned about how others will react or judge you when you share your recovery status. This is natural. Some people do not understand what recovery is. They may ask questions. Occasionally, such questions may be asked provocatively, questioning or even testing your commitment to recovery. However, most of the time people ask questions because they genuinely wish to know more. They may want to know why you’ve chosen this particular path because they have questions about their own alcohol or other drug use or are concerned about a family member or friend.

Increasingly, people in recovery are emerging from the shadows and throwing off the yoke of the stigma long attached to addiction. Recovery is becoming more common and accepted in mainstream society. You may be surprised to find that the vast majority of people will respect your recovery and accept it without difficulty.

In terms of how to tell someone that you’re in recovery, there are several options. Generally, the best approach is to be direct and matter-of-fact: “I’m in recovery.” If you’re in a situation where drinking or drug use is suggested or you’re offered a drink or a joint (or something else), you can simply say, “No thank you.” If the other person wants to know why, you can simply say, “I don’t drink (or smoke pot, or do other drugs).”

Other options include: “I’m retired from that area,” “I’m allergic to alcohol,” etc., and “I just don’t like it.” However, it’s important to know that the other person isn’t owed an explanation and offering one is strictly your choice. Like any other new skill, telling another person that you are in recovery becomes easier and more comfortable with time and practice.

SOURCES:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/some-assembly-required/201705/what-you-need-know-about-relationships-and-recovery

www.crossroadsrecovery.co.za

+27 012 345 1186 Pretoria

+27 010 597 7784 Johannesburg

No Obligation Addiction Assessment

Book a No Obligation Confidential Assessment at your nearest Treatment Centre Today.

Johannesburg Admissions: +27 74 895 1043
Pretoria Admissions: +27 82 653 3311
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Stories of Recovery

  • The encouragement, love and support from the team at Crossroads allowed me to eventually see that I was worth something - that my life could be turned around and that I could accomplish the things that had long been a forgotten dream.
    Oliver VG
    Read more
  • On the last day of my stint at Crossroads I could only express gratitude towards all who works there. A wise councillor once commented on my question when one is ready for rehab by explaining that when one is ready for rehab, rehab is ready for you.
    Johan B
    Read more
  • I was lost and my soul was broken until I ended up at Crossroads and was introduced to the Twelve Steps. With the help of their excellent staff and amazing support I have recently been clean for 18 months, I could not have done it without them!
    Carla S
    Read more
  • "Just for today I am more than three years in recovery. I have Cross Roads to thank for this wonderful gift. Cross Roads helped me to set a firm foundation in my recovery on which I can continue to build."
    Angelique J
    Read more
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The relationship between aggression and addiction

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Home / Posts tagged "12 step"

The relationship between aggression and addiction

31 May, 2019Articles, News

Aggression, in the form of anger, frequently manifests in people with addiction problems. If you do not believe this is true, look to science, which tells us that there is a definite correlation between aggression and addiction. The Psychiatric Times reports, “The tendency to engage in violent behaviour is a potentially important risk factor for suicide in substance abusers.”

Is there a connection between aggression and addiction? How are the two related? Why do they often go hand-in-hand? Can a person get help with both?

The National Institute on Drug Abuse covered a recent study that showed the ties between addiction and aggression. They used mice to show a possible correlation between the disruptions of our brain circuitry that comes from substance use addiction and aggressive behaviour. Seventy percent of the male mice acted aggressively toward smaller mice when exposed to protocols that mirror human addictive behaviour.

Addiction, Aggression, and Healthy Behaviour

People with substance use disorders, whether they are co-occurring with mental illness or not, do not engage in healthy behaviour. The substance they are using inhibits how they deal with emotions, masking them in the pleasurable feelings that come with the drug or alcohol use. But these emotions do not go away and can build up, only to be unleashed when the substance abuser simply cannot bottle them up anymore.
The correlation between substance abuse and violent behaviour has been well documented. For example, the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment noted that more than 75 percent of people who begin treatment for drug addiction report having performed various acts of violence, including (but not limited to) mugging, physical assault, and using a weapon to attack another person. Examining gender differences, the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs found that before seeking treatment for substance abuse, the rate of violent acts was as high as 72 percent among men and 50 percent among women. People enrolling in treatment were referred by family members because of violent behaviour carried out while under the influence. Furthermore, researchers found that aggression between two people in a romantic or sexual relationship was “associated with heavy drinking episodes and cocaine use.”

Why is there a link between alcohol abuse and violence?

In 2010, Live Science reported the results of a Scandinavian study that found the risk for violent behaviour increases with intoxication, but only among individuals who are prone to suppressing their feelings of anger while they are sober. Testing people who reported that they were prone to burying their angry feelings, researchers observed a 5 percent increase in violent behaviour that followed a 10 percent increase in drinking to the point of getting drunk. People who didn’t work their anger out were more likely to get drunk, and that state of drunkenness was connected to a rise in the chance of engaging in violent behaviour. People who did not suppress their angry feelings did not show a similar association.

The researchers noted that “only a tiny fraction of all drinking events involve violence,” but the likelihood of being violent while drinking appeared to be based on how well people who drink can deal with their anger while they’re sober. Since drinking alcohol can lower inhibitions, increase risky behaviour, and rob people of their self-control, an individual with unreleased rage can act out when sufficiently intoxicated.
For people struggling with addiction, both aggression and substance use can be tackled in drug rehab centres. These facilities are designed to deal with co-occurring illnesses such as mental health and substance use disorders. These healthcare providers can treat the substance use disorder, helping the patient safely go through withdrawal. Then, a variety of behavioural and therapeutic counselling practices can help the patient deal with their underlying emotions.

If you or a loved one needs assistance with substance abuse – know that help is readily available. The road to recovery is not always an easy one but getting yourself or your loved one the best possible care from the team at Crossroads Recovery Centre, provides you with a map to sober, healthy living. No matter how bad things seem, there is hope and it’s only a phone call away. If you or anyone close to you needs help with an addiction to sex, gambling, substances, alcohol or food, please contact us for a free assessment.

Resources

https://www.ridgefieldrecovery.com/blog/aggression-addiction-co-occurring-problems-washington-state/

https://americanaddictioncenters.org/rehab-guide/addiction-and-violence

www.crossroadsrecovery.co.za

+27 012 345 1186 Pretoria

+27 010 597 7784 Johannesburg

No Obligation Addiction Assessment

Book a No Obligation Confidential Assessment at your nearest Treatment Centre Today.

Johannesburg Admissions: +27 74 895 1043
Pretoria Admissions: +27 82 653 3311
Close

Stories of Recovery

  • The encouragement, love and support from the team at Crossroads allowed me to eventually see that I was worth something - that my life could be turned around and that I could accomplish the things that had long been a forgotten dream.
    Oliver VG
    Read more
  • On the last day of my stint at Crossroads I could only express gratitude towards all who works there. A wise councillor once commented on my question when one is ready for rehab by explaining that when one is ready for rehab, rehab is ready for you.
    Johan B
    Read more
  • I was lost and my soul was broken until I ended up at Crossroads and was introduced to the Twelve Steps. With the help of their excellent staff and amazing support I have recently been clean for 18 months, I could not have done it without them!
    Carla S
    Read more
  • "Just for today I am more than three years in recovery. I have Cross Roads to thank for this wonderful gift. Cross Roads helped me to set a firm foundation in my recovery on which I can continue to build."
    Angelique J
    Read more
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